Atlanta Ballet Gennadi Nedvigin | Artistic Director

Atlanta Ballet Gennadi Nedvigin | Artistic Director

Bach to Broadway

Bach to Broadway

Live with Atlanta Ballet Orchestra

Jackie Nash & Jacob Bush. Photo by Charlie McCullers.

May 11-13, 2018 Bach to Broadway

  • Who Cares? Choreography by George Balanchine
  • Music by George Gershwin
  • Live with Atlanta Ballet Orchestra
  • 7 for Eight Choreography by Helgi Tomasson
  • Music by Johann Sebastian Bach
  • Live with Atlanta Ballet Orchestra
  • Concerto Armonico (World Premiere) Choreography by Maxim Petrov
  • Music by Alexander Tcherepnin
  • Live with Atlanta Ballet Orchestra & Harmonica Soloist

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Atlanta Ballet is closing out the season on a high note with three works accompanied by the Atlanta Ballet Orchestra!

Teeming with the energy of the City that Never Sleeps and the glitz of Broadway, Who Cares? is “a carefree ballet that will… send people out… humming and even smiling” (The New York Times). Set to 9 Gershwin classics, Atlanta Ballet is pleased to present the Company premiere of this spirited classic!

Complementing Balanchine’s vibrant work, San Francisco Ballet Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson’s 7 for Eight evokes the Balanchine style with fluid, dramatic choreography that intertwines the 8 dancers with the sumptuous melodies of 7 Bach movements.

The May program also includes the world premiere of Concerto Armonico by Mariinsky Theatre’s Maxim Petrov, who is making his North American choreographic debut with Atlanta Ballet. The work is driven by the powerful, dynamic musical score, a concerto composed for harmonica and orchestra.

  • Venue
    Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

    The Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre is the first major performing arts facility built in metro Atlanta in four decades.

    Location and Parking
    The Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre is located in northwest Atlanta near the junction of I-75 and I-285, at the intersection of Cobb Galleria Parkway and Akers Mill Road.  Pre-paid parking is available for $12.00 through Parking Panda and AAA Parking for performances. Please note: the pre-paid parking option allows you a parking spot in the parking deck, not necessarily an assigned space. Day of parking will still be available for $6.00 (cash or credit). Valet parking is available for The Atlanta Opera and Atlanta Ballet only for $15.00 (cash or credit card). Please do not park in the Toys"R"Us lot on Akers Mill Rd. This is not approved parking for the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, so your car may be booted or towed if left there. Click here for dining, hotel, and additional venue information.

    Emergency Phone Number
    The 24-hour public safety number for the Cobb Energy Centre is 770.916.2911. Please leave your seat location with your babysitter or answering service so that the house manager may find you in case of an emergency.

    Special Needs
    The venue is ADA compliant. Designated seats in various locations are available for guests with disabilities and those needing special assistance. The venue is equipped with wheelchair accessible courtesy phones, elevators, plaza ramps, wheelchair accessible ticket windows, and wheelchair accessible drinking fountains.  For more information, please call 770.916.2800.

  • Group Discounts

    Community and Corporate Group Tickets

    It only takes 10 people to benefit from Atlanta Ballet's Group Sales program.  With our fast, friendly and convenient service, you can secure the best seats in the house in no time at all. Groups save up to 40% on regular prices!

    Click here for details and to submit a request to Myredith Gonzales, Group Sales Manager.

  • Seating Chart

    Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre

  • Video
  • Conductor

    TARA SIMONCIC (Conductor) frequently works with symphony orchestras as well as opera and ballet companies in America and abroad. Ms. Simoncic served as music director of Ballet West from 2015-2018 and is a frequent guest conductor with the New York City Ballet and the Louisville Ballet. She recently made her conducting debut with the Ballet at Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. Ms. Simoncic is principal conductor of the Flexible Orchestra in New York City as well as music director of the Greenwich Symphony’s Young People’s Concerts. In addition to her work in the United States, Tara Simoncic has conducted performances of Don Giovanniin Trieste, Italy and The Barber of Sevillewith the Slovenian National Opera Ballet Theatre. She holds a BM in Trumpet Performance from the New England Conservatory, a MM in Orchestral Conducting from Northwestern University and a Professional Studies Diploma in Conducting from Manhattan School of Music.

  • Choreographers

    GEORGE BALANCHINE (Choreographer,Who Cares?) (January 22, 1904 – April 30, 1983) transformed the world of ballet. He is widely regarded as the most influential choreographer of the 20thcentury, and he co-founded two of the ballet’s most important institutions: New York City Ballet and the School of American Ballet. Balanchine was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1904, studied at the Imperial Ballet School in St. Petersburg, and danced with Maryinsky Theatre Ballet Company, where he began choreographing short works. In the summer of 1924, Balanchine left the newly formed Soviet Union for Europe, where he was invited by impresario Serge Diaghilev to join the Ballet Russes. For that company, Balanchine choreographed his first important ballets: Apollo(1928) and Prodigal Son(1929). After Ballet Russes was dissolved following Diaghilev’s death in 1929, Balanchine spent his next few years on a variety of projects in Europe and then formed his own company, Les Ballets 1933, in Paris. There, he met American arts connoisseur Lincoln Kirstein, who persuaded him to come to the United States. In 1934, the pair founded the School of American Ballet, which remains in operation to this day, training students for companies around the world. Balanchine’s first ballet in the U.S., Serenade, set to music by Tchaikovsky, was created for SAB students and premiered on June 9, 1934, on the grounds of an estate in White Plains in 1946, which was renamed New York City Ballet in 1948. Balanchine served as the Company’s ballet master from that year until his death in 1983, building it into one of the most important performing arts institutions in the world, and a cornerstone of the cultural life of New York City. He choreographed 425 works over the course of 60-plus years, and his musical choices ranged from Tchaikovsky (one of his favorite composers) to Stravinsky (his compatriot and friend) to Gershwin (who embodied the choreographer’s love of America). Many Balanchine’s works are considered masterpieces and are performed by ballet companies all over the world.

    MAXIM PETROV (Choreographer, Concerto Armonico) graduated from Vaganova Academy of Russian Ballet in 2012 and joined the Mariinsky Ballet the same year. In April 2014, as part of The Creative Workshop of Young Choreographersat the Mariinsky Theatre, he presented the one-act ballet Cinemato music by Erik Satie. He also provided choreography for the operas War and Peace(directed by Graham Vick, 2014), The Golden Cockerel(directed by Anna Matison, 2015) and Samson et Dalila(directed by Yannish Kokkos, 2016). In 2015, at The Creative Workshop of Young Choreographers, he presented the one-act piece Ballet No 2to music by Alexander Tsfasman (Jazz Suite), which subsequently entered the Mariinsky Theatre’s repertoire. June 2015 saw the premiere of the ballet Le Divertissement du roi, created for Igor Kolb to music by Jean-Philippe Rameau. In April 2016, as part of The Creative Workshop of Young Choreographers, Petrov presented the ballet Pavloskyto music by Karen LaFrak. In July 2016, he premiered the one-act ballet Russian Overtureto music by Sergei Prokofiev. In 2017, for The Creative Workshop of Young Choreographers, he staged the duet Tromba Lontanato the music by Jon Adams, and collaborated on The Dreamers, Beyondand Lose Yourself to Dance(together with Ilya Zhivoi) to the music of Daft Punk.

    HELGI TOMASSON (Choreographer, 7 for Eight) is the artistic director and principal choreographer. He is regarded as one of the supreme classical dancers of his generation. His uncompromising commitment to classicism remains his preoccupation as a choreographer, teacher and coach; it is the foundation of SF Ballet School’s training. Helgi began his ballet training in Iceland, his birthplace, then continued his studies at Denmark’s Pantomime Theatre and at George Balanchine's School of American Ballet in New York. He joined The Joffrey Ballet in 1961; two years later he became a member of Harkness Ballet. Over the next six years, he became one of that company's most celebrated dancers. In 1969, Helgi entered the First International Ballet Competition in Moscow and returned to the United States with the silver medal. The following year, Balanchine invited him to join New York City Ballet as a principal dancer. He quickly established himself as one of ballet's consummate artists: a dancer of technical purity, poetic grace, musicality and intelligence. Helgi left the stage in 1985, when he became artistic director of SF Ballet. He brought a gift for choreographing and teaching, a dynamic vision and the pursuit of excellence. Under his guidance, SF Ballet has achieved recognition as one of the finest ballet companies in the world. Helgi expects no less from SF Ballet School, which he believes is central to the life and evolution of the company. The training at the school is designed to develop the qualities that Tomasson feels are essential to professional dancers: strong classical technique, musicality, coordination, dedication, a commitment to the art form and a joy of dancing.

  • Designers & Artistic Team

    KAY BARRELL (Scenic Designer, Who Cares?) began as a professional dance designer in 1967 and has never slowed down. He began with Repertory Dance Theatre when Modern Dance was at its peak,. After seventeen years of touring the continent.,  he was hired at Ballet West, beginning in 1985. In the twenty-four years with Ballet West he worked with every Artistic Director in the history of the company, Willam Christensen, Bruce Marks, John Hart, Jonas Kage and Adam Sklute. . Kay produced and lit dance in every state, in both tiny to giant venues including six times at the Kennedy Center. He has designed in Europe, Canada and South America. After fifty-one years in the dance business, he may be slowing down a bit.

    Photo by Veronica Lapteva.

    KONSTANTIN BINKIN (Lighting Designer, Concerto Armonico) was born in St Petersburg to a theatre family.In 2014, he graduated from the Russian State Institute of Stage Arts, specializing in stage design technology.As a lighting designer at the Mariinsky Theatre, he has designed the ballet Le Divertissement du Roi (choreographed by Maxim Petrov, 2015), Russian Overture (choreographed by Maxim Petrov, 2016), Violin Concerto No 2 (choreographed by Anton Pimonov, 2017), Paquita (choreographed by Yuri Smekalov, 2017), The Cat on the Tree (choreographed by Anton Pimonov, 2017), Seasons (choreographed by Ilya Zhivoy, 2017) and pieces for The Creative Workshop of Young Choreographers in 2016 and 2017.As a lighting designer for The Theatre Ballet Moscow, he has designed the ballets Moon across the Way (choreography by Anton Pimoniov, 2016) and Kreutzer Sonata (choreography by Robert Binet, 2017).In Europe, he has designed for the ballet Her Name Was Carmen (choreography by Olga Kostel, 2016), presented by the St. Petersburg Ballet Theatre at The London Coliseum, and the ballet Enoch Arden (choreography by Donvena Pandoursky, 2017) at the Münster Theatre in Germany.

    DAVID FINN (Lighting Designer,7 for Eight) began his career as a lighting designer at age 16 working for the puppeteer Burr Tillstrom and Kukla, Fran & Ollie. David's previous work with Atlanta Ballet includes The Four SeasonsClassical Symphony, The Exiled and Camino Real (also scenic design).  His dance work includes The Nutcracker(Birmingham Royal Ballet), Romeo & Juliette(Paris Opera Ballet), Swan Lake (The Royal Ballet and Bayerisches Staatsballett), and works for choreographers Paul Taylor, Twyla Tharp, Sasha Waltz, Merce Cunningham, James Kudelka, José Limón, Liam Scarlett and Dana Reitz. David was resident lighting designer for Baryshnikov’s White Oak Dance Project from 1993-2000.  His opera work includes projects for the Metropolitan Opera, Royal Opera, Paris Opera, La Scala Milan, Salzburg Festival, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Berlin Staatsoper, La Monnaie, Dutch Nationale Opera, Stuttgart Opera, Opera Australia, Canadian Opera Company, and San Francisco Opera.  For film, Finn consulted on Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence and directed the PBS documentary The Green Monster.  David designed ZED (Tokyo) and MICHAEL JACKSON ONE (Las Vegas) for Cirque du Soleil. Future plans include Atlanta Ballet’s The Nutcracker, Anna Karenina for the Joffrey Ballet, The Crucible for the Scottish Ballet andThe Flying Dutchman for the Metropolitan Opera.

    JUDITH FUGATE (Répétiteur, Who Cares?)is a former principal ballerina with the New York City Ballet and danced roles in virtually every ballet in the NYCB repertoire with her partners Peter Martins, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Nikolaj Hübbe. During her career, she toured extensively with groups led by renowned artists Mr. Baryshnikov, Cynthia Gregory, and Mr. Martins. She currently works as répétiteur for the George Balanchine Trust and the Jerome Robbins Rights Trust, staging these renowned choreographers’ works worldwide. Additionally, she directs Ballet N.Y., a small contemporary ballet company based in NYC, with her husband, Medhi Bahiri. It is a company of accomplished dancers that has performed not only in NYC but also toured the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Visit balletny.org.

    DAVID HEUVEL (Costume Designer, Who Cares?) is presently costume production director for Ballet West and has been associated with that company since 1979, originally joining Ballet West at the request of then artistic director Bruce Marks. Previously, he was chief costumer for ballet at P.A.C.T. in South Africa. He left Ballet West for a freelance career in 1989 and returned to Ballet West in 1998. Mr. Heuvel has designed and built costumes for many ballet companies, both nationally and internationally, including Ballet Du Nord, Universal Ballet, Singapore Ballet, Carolina Ballet, Washington Ballet, American Repertory Ballet, Atlanta Ballet, Nashville Ballet,  Arizona Ballet, Oregon Ballet Theatre, Richmond Ballet and, of course, Ballet West.

    TATYANA NOGINOVA (Costume Designer, Concerto Armonico) graduated from the staging department of the Leningrad State Institute of Theater, Music and Cinematography, specializing in costume design and technology. From 1993 to 2017, she was chief costume designer at the Mariinsky Theater. Noginova designed costumes for 90 theater, opera and ballet productions. At the Mariinsky Theater’s A Creative Workshop of Young Choreographers, she designed for Divertissement of the KingRussian OvertureOpheliaBoleroand Premonition of Spring.She lectures on the history of costumes and the technology of making costumes at the Russian Ballet Academy, Vaganova Ballet Academy, I.E. Repin Institute and NTC "Progress."She worked with such directors as Vladimir Gurfinkel, Alexander Zykov, Alexei Stepaniuc, Francesca Zambello, David Pountney, Andrei Konchalovsky, Anna Matisson, Irina Molostova, Lindsay Posner, Philip Razenkov, Alexei Franchettti, and Pavel Sorokin and such choreographers as Alexei Miroshnichenko, Sergei Vikharev, Yuri Burlaka, Anton Pimonov, Maxim Petrov, Noa Gelber, Yuri Smekalov, Cyril Simonov, and Ksenia Zvereva.

    ANITA PACIOTTI (Stager, 7 for Eight), a native of Oakland, California, was an original member of the Oakland Ballet. She studied ballet at San Francisco Ballet School and joined the Company in 1968, where she performed numerous leading roles in ballets such as Sir Frederick Ashton’s La Fille mal gardéeand George Balanchine’s SerenadeSymphony in C, and The Four Temperaments.  In 1987, Paciotti was appointed principal character dancer, and the role of Carabosse in Tomasson’s The Sleeping Beautywas created on her, as well as the role of Nurse in Tomasson’s Romeo & Juliet. Paciotti has staged ballets by David Bintley, James Kudelka, Yuri Possokhov, Jerome Robbins (In the Nightand Afternoon of a Faun), and Yuri Possokhov (Firebirdfor Atlanta Ballet 16|17 Season). Biography courtesy of San Francisco Ballet.

    ANASTASIA TRAVKINA & SERGEI JDANOV (Scenic Designers, Concerto Armonico) make up the art group Bojemoi and are based in Moscow. Bojemoi uses mainly collage technics, working in a range of areas from illustrations for Internet and printed media to theatrical scenography and animation. They worked for Internet media company Batenka.ru, The Moscow Times magazine, Sobaka magazine and others. Since 2015, they’ve working on a social media project called Boroda Tolstogo, which is dedicated to works and views of Leo Tolstoy. In 2016, Bojemoi created scenography for the ballets Russian Overtureand Violin Concerto No.2 at the Mariinsky II Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia. They are currently working on a media project dedicated to works by Russian writer Venedikt Yerofeyev.

    SANDRA WOODALL (Costume Designer, 7 for Eight) has contributed scenic and costume designs to San Francisco Ballet, Frankfurt Ballet, Stuttgart Ballet, Bolshoi Ballet, Georgian National Ballet, The Norwegian National Ballet, the State Opera Ballet of Austria, Dance Theatre of Harlem, Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Houston Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Project, Singapore Dance Theatre, National Ballet of Finland and other companies around the world. Ms. Woodall’s artwork has been shown in solo exhibitions at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut, the San Francisco Museum of Performance and Design, and in many group exhibitions, including the 2011 Wearable Art exhibit in Hong Kong. In 1999 and 2000, she was a Fulbright scholar teaching at what is now the Taiwan National University of the Arts (TNUA). She has designed many productions in Taiwan and China, including 2009’s opening pageant for the Deaf Olympics, scenic designs for the 100th anniversary of Taiwan National Day, scenic and costume design of Winter Journey by Wan Fang and directed by Stan Lai in Beijing, and scenic and costume designs for the entire opening season of Theatre Above in Shanghai. Ms. Woodall is currently designing the newNutcracker for Atlanta Ballet to premiere December 2018.

  • Guest Artists

    ROBERT BONFIGLIO (Harmonica Soloist, Concerto Armonico) is the founding director of the Grand Canyon Music Festival. Called "the Paganini of the Harmonica" by The Los Angeles Times, Robery Bonfiglio has dazzled audiences at Carnegie Hall, Hollywood Bowl, Gewandhaus, Teatro Colón, Teatro Massimo, Teatro Amazonas, Kennedy Center, Boston Symphony Hall, Lincoln Center, and throughout the world with his ability to play harmonica concertos and “sizzle” on the blues. Bonfiglio has been a concerto soloist with leading orchestras around the world, including Minnesota Orchestra, Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, the Orchestra of the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Luxembourg Philharmonic, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Madrid Radio Television Española Orchestra, Mexico City Philharmonic, Milwaukee Symphony, Pittsburgh Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In 1988, Cynthia Gregory and Fernando Bujones, two ballet stars who had not performed together since 1985, danced at City Center in a piece choreographed by Lynne Taylor-Corbett to Vilem Tausky's “Concertino for Harmonica and Orchestra,” for which Robert Bonfiglio was the soloist.

    SHIRLEY IREK (Pianist, 7 for Eight) was born in Croatia and educated at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, California Institute of the Arts in Los Angeles and the Juilliard School, where she received her bachelor’s and master's degrees in performance. She gave her solo debut at the age of 5, performing for the prime minister of Canada, followed by an orchestral debut at the age of 7, playing the Mozart Concerto, K.488 with the Toronto Chamber Orchestra.In her junior year at Juilliard, she won the concerto competition and performed the Mozart Concerto K.482 with the Juilliard Orchestra at Lincoln Center. Upon graduation, Shirley received the highest honor for pianists, the first Van Cliburn Award for outstanding achievement among pianists. Shirley has performed throughout Europe, Africa and Japan. In 1996, she moved to Atlanta and has been a frequent soloist with the Atlanta Ballet. She is the proud mother of two children and the proud teacher of many students in her Buckhead studio, where she enjoys sharing her passion for music.